Parliamentary inquiries


Parliamentary inquiries
   Although both chambers of Par liament have the right to carry out investigations and inquiries, only the Second (Lower) Chamber has used this right so far. Between 1852 and 1887, members of Parliament chose this means particularly for the purpose of increasing their knowledge about society. After World War II, an inquiry was organized to evaluate the govern ment’s acts during the years of war, when the Parliament had not functioned. In 1977, it was made possible to hear ministers and civil servants under oath. Since then, the use of this right has increased. Recent examples of the subjects of inquiries are the Srebrenica tragedy (2002–2003), corruption in the Dutch building industry (2002–2003), and the Bijlmerdisaster(1998–1999). Some inquiries have had direct political consequences for the ministers in question.

Historical Dictionary of the Netherlands. . 2012.

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